KIPPLELAKE, 2010

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Carola Bonfili, Kipplelake, 2010, 12 monitor, wood structure, audio project by Matteo Nasini, MACRO, Rome
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Kipplelake, 2010, installation view, MACRO, Rome
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Kipplelake, 2010,installation view, MACRO, Rome
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Carola Bonfili, Kipplelake, 2010 , video stills, DVD
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Carola Bonfili, Kipplelake, 2010 , video stills, DVD
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Carola Bonfili, Kipplelake, 2010 , video stills, DVD

Kipplelake consists of twelve videos shot in 2010 with a defective camera. The work’s title incorporates the word “ kipple”, coined by Philip Dick, which refers to a residual generated by electronic equipment. The audio is made up of multiple recordings of bats and purring cats that mirror the vibration in the video. The videos are installed underneath a set of bleachers, on which people could sit to view a video from another artist which was installed in the same exhibition space. I decided to use the word kipple, coined by Philip K. Dick, which refers to the refuse created by electrical appliances, because I am interested in the particular language that originates in science fiction literature to describe objects which we haven’t yet had cause to name in real life: in this instance, for digital waste, which occupies as much mental space as certain images that involuntarily return to mind. These images function as an unconscious process producing and structuring dreams from one second to another, without telling cause from effect. There remains only a trace to which one tries to give meaning. From the recorded material I have chosen the parts where a subjective vision emerges, where it is almost like peeking at the memories of people I don’t know at all. This gives the impression of recording scenes that had already happened and had already been filtered, removing real perception from the action itself.